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    The World is Changing Fast – How Do I Keep My Career Up to Date?

    It’s easy to get lulled into a false sense of security – you’ve left corporate life, started your own business and it seems to be going well (touchwood) – so keeping up to date for the job market seems pointless? Right?

    Wrong! You never know what is around the corner, and being prepared enables you to pivot and removes the stress of that potential uncertainty. And praying you don’t have to go back to work “for the man” isn’t a concrete career strategy, I’ve found.

    Whether you’re a tertiary graduate, entrepreneur, Millennial, chief executive or baby boomer, here are some powerful ways to stay on top of your game and be prepared for change.

    So here are the top 10 easy-to-implement actions you can take to stay valuable:

    1. Be open to all possibilities
    2. Diversify your income streams
    3. Be aware of common changes in the workplace
    4. Don’t be a negative buzzkill
    5. Keep learning – especially about your industry
    6. Thrive through your connections
    7. Record your achievements
    8. Learn to play nice
    9. Be clear about YOUR super-powers
    10. Stay hopeful

    Want more detail on these? Read the full blog on my website.

    Embrace networking as a powerful strategy that keeps your career alive, read my blog on how I survived a month-long networking blitz and what I learned about connecting.

    Tracey Beard is the Chief Encouragement Officer at Career Matters - she helps students and young adults across New Zealand to make confident career choices. Tracey is disrupting the way that students, their parents and schools handle career exploration, as the job market has changed and students feel overwhelmed with the numerous career choices in front of them. 

    Tracey uses powerful online career-based personality profiles to help young adults between 16 and 25 years of age to embrace their uniqueness, find their purpose and get excited about their future. She loves to talk about careers and being a parent of teenagers herself, she understands the pressure that parents feel in trying to support their child through this process. 

    You can find Tracey at www.careermatters.co.nz or on Facebook.